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Sep 21 16 10:24 AM

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Hi,

Just out of curiosity; has anybody of you ever participated in a LGTBQ+ pride parade? Dressed "up" or normal?

Why did you do it and what was your experience? If you haven't then why not? Because you prefer anonymity or because you don't like the concept of pride parades?

Regards

Nat
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#1 [url]

Sep 22 16 4:00 AM

I have take part in local pride events, for sure, although I have not walked in the Parade. I know that I can walk in the parade even if I am not "out", but I must admit the idea brings out a lot of conflicting feelings in me. I know that I am part of the LGBT family. Indeed, I am collaborating with a lot of trans women who recognizes me as one of them: another trans activist. But the fact that I have not transitioned makes it a bit difficult for me. It is all in my head, I know. I am working on it. My wife has asked me several times now: She wants to walk in the parade.

So at pride events I look like the interested and sympathetic supporter. I have many gay friends, so this surprises no one.

I love the pride events in my town, though. I love the diversity of all the people, from the akward and shy FTM geeks to the flamboyant MTF queens, and I love the fact that all these people can stand together demanding the right to live as who they are.

 I'm with a network of tgirls (transwomen) who hate the LGB (or GLB) community because they think the alphabet soup group is all about silly leftist politics.  


This is not the case in Norway. In fact, the largest section of the recen pride parades have been from the Conservative Party. Here even the right wing populist "Progess Party" takes part in the parade, as did the leader of the Christian People's Party this year. This is probably one of the reasons the transgender community won a long fought battle this year. We may now -- if we want to -- legally change our gender, without the permission of medical gate keepers and without surgery, as was the case before.


 

Last Edited By: jackmolay Sep 22 16 11:03 PM. Edited 1 time.

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#2 [url]

Sep 22 16 7:57 AM

jackmolay wrote:
This is not the case in Norway. In fact, the largest section of the recen pride parades have been from the Conservative Party. Here even the right wing populist "Progess Party" takes part in the parade, as did the leader of the Christian People's Party this year. This is probably one of the reasons the transgender community won a long fought battle this year. We may now -- if we want to -- legally change our gender, without the permission of medical gate keepers and without surgery, as was the case before.

 

There are obviously still huge issues with discrimination against LGBTQ+ people. And there are regions in the world where rights are stagnating or even deteriorating. But I still think that overall we are marching towards greater inclusion of people of variant sexuality, sex or gender. Among other things, I find it interesting to see how younger trans people are faring. Many of them have much different (and better) fates compared to us older.

As for participitaiton in pride I have considered it many times, but have never actually done it (dressed or not). I also think it primarily a problem in my own head, than a real problem. I think that talking part in the pride without being dressed would be a healthy step for me.





 

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#3 [url]

Sep 22 16 8:20 AM

I have never been to a pride parade, but I have been to a pride festival. This was about a year and half ago, when I was about a year into transition, so yes I appeared female, but I was dressed rather casually in jeans and a tank top. I have also gone to pride events at local clubs.

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#4 [url]

Oct 7 16 11:38 AM

I confess I'm just not one of life marchers. There have been marches here in support of the UK's continued membership of the EU - and I haven't been on those even though its something I believe strongly in. Even if I transitioned I can't see me taking part in a Pride march

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#5 [url]

Oct 8 16 7:27 AM

I also have not marched in a pride parade but recently I am thinking I would join although not dressed any differently. Earlier this year I attended a TDoV celebration in San Francisco, which was kinda fun but not as much as I'd hoped for. Maybe it was because I was on edge, and I plan on going again next year. Yesterday while biking I was thinking of designing a pride T-shirt for TDoV, something simple that I would feel comfortable wearing.

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#6 [url]

Oct 8 16 9:35 AM

This is another area where where it gets really complicated in regards to the trans community. I forgot to mention in my previous post that many of the clubs and gay bars I go to regularly, have LGBTQ events, usually fund raisers for various awareness causes. The T portion of the LGBTQ always seems well underrepresented at those events. You rarely see older transitioners at these activities, just the younger club trans crowd. For a long time, I thought that the older trans were just not into the club / bar scene, and that was the reason they avoided these events, but I have had some conversations with some older transitioners in a monthly support group I attend, and a lot of them are just not terribly into the whole LGBT scene in general. Many of them don't even think of themselves in that way. They regard themselves as very different category,. something like CIS women just born with the wrong DNA.

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#7 [url]

Oct 8 16 8:34 PM

Please don't feel like a coward, it's not worth it. We have all been scared and most have been ashamed but it's not worth it to feel that way. I know that is easy to say and harder to follow up on but it's true. There is nothing - not a single thing - wrong for being the way you are, anywhere on the transgender spectrum. We may be few but we are the way we are, born innocent into this world, and viable and valuable just the way we are.

I was in Portugal in late 2014, by the way. I loved it! I had meetings with Portugal Telecom. Such a vibrant and beautiful country. I hope to return someday when I have more time to really experience it.

Emma

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#8 [url]

Oct 10 16 4:58 AM

Im transgender myself and I feel like a coward just hiding myself with an alpha male mask while I could do something about it


I am with Emma in this: There is far too much shame in crossdreamer and transgender circles already. We should definitely not add to the burden by saying that some are not "out enough", or "trans enough" or "brave enough". We do not know why other people do what they do. Of all people we should know the price of social exclusion and the fear of losing the ones we love.

So, ThoundahBaustusShawn, do what you can do when you are ready for it, and not before.

(And yes, you might meet the love of your life at a Pride event. That has happened before!)

 

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#9 [url]

Oct 12 16 3:12 AM

Other than being a self closeted faggot and not particularly into the 'progressive' aesthetics on display, the reason I would never join a LGBT+ parade is political.

image

Why don't these nitwits realize they would be the first to be thrown off the roof tops the moment Islam takes over in any western country?

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#10 [url]

Oct 12 16 3:23 AM

Only certain kinds of Islam.. I know someone, not well but a little, who is openly gay and Muslim... But even so, reaching out and saying 'we don't want to hate you EVEN IF you might want to hate us" has a certain class

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#11 [url]

Oct 12 16 4:56 AM

PipX wrote:
Only certain kinds of Islam.. I know someone, not well but a little, who is openly gay and Muslim... But even so, reaching out and saying 'we don't want to hate you EVEN IF you might want to hate us" has a certain class

Not in the face of facts to the contrary. Then it's not a matter of class, but only of shame.

But you're right about the aspirations of "class". The biggest driver behind political correctness has always been the ability to exploit an aloof, moralistic, bigoted "better than thou"-attitude. It's a deeply bourgeois sentiment, allowing people who want to be considered spiritually superior in some sense, to delineate a seperation between themselves and the common working class rabble.

You know someone? Well, so do I. Several in fact. I know Muslims who feel terrible about what other Muslims do in their name, and who have gone to the extent of taking on western names to mark the difference. It usually sounds like something directly out of a tacky 80's soap opera. I can symphatize with that. They're the Muslims who left because they didn't want to be Muslims.

So in other words, is there is somehing we could call a "moderate" Islam? Of course there is. But how far does it go and how moderate is it? I wouldn't write on that check before I knew just exactly what it meant, but the PC people, unilaterally backed up by Big Media, calls everyone who do not do so at once, while intensily plugging their ears, turning a blind eye and shouting "I can't heeeear you!", a Nazi. Is that smart? Or is it just a rethorical bludgeon like any other? The left does not want to be proven wrong. They were proven wrong once and it was painful. So for the contigent of the left who jumped on the replacement PC-multicultural-identity bandwagon in the 90's, they'll stoop to any dirty trick to prevent such a thing from ever happening again. Cost what may. In other words, they don't care about you. Nor me. Nor if some women happen to get tyrannized, raped and killed. In fact, they don't care if The Caliphate actually is the future, for they have alrady discarded the notion of culture, civilization and ethnicity as so-called "essentialist" non-entities.

Anyway, here are some numbers from Great Britain. Turns out 23% of British Muslims thought Sharia law should replace British law in areas with large Muslim populations; 52% thought homosexuality should be illegal and 33% refused to categorically forbid stonings of women on grounds of adultery. Etc:
https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/7861/british-muslims-survey

So what preciesely is moderate Islam? And If moderate Islam is moderate, how moderate is it?

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#12 [url]

Dec 24 16 9:05 PM

In my life i'm participated only in political marches. 5 years ago, it was a time of big wave of antigoverment protests in Russia, i felt me part of this movement and dreamed of change future of my country. Well we lost and now just sitting quietly in the homes and tremble with fear.
But in Pride-marches i nver participated. Because pride-march in Russia is russian roulette. It is 100% illegal according to law and every march you have high chance to be beaten by police, progovement paramilitary organisations, neo-nazi or crazy pro-church activists.. No way, i'm not superhero for it....
In Japan, i some-times thinking about it, and when get news about events eery time thinking "why not?" Probably next time, i will really participate in prife march.
And yes, it is some-kind what stop me for it is strong connection of LGBTQ prides with some politic labels. Like if you part of community you as default support all ideas like multiculturalism, socialism, ecoconservatism, feminism and so on.
Yes some of this ideas good for me, but some other not. And i want participate in marches, where i only present me like part of LGBTQ but without other political labels.

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#13 [url]

Feb 14 17 9:53 AM

Yes I have I walked with a transgender support group here in San Diego a number of years ago. It was fun but I don't know if I would do it again mostly;y because it wasn't that much fun and I missed the parade and pride parades are always a crack up lots of bizarre characters and interesting floats. I have been to several as a spectator

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#14 [url]

Feb 15 17 3:14 AM

Welcome to CDL, Sallee!

Can I ask if you have taken part in other events organized by the local LGBT community? I am asking because it is always interesting to hear to what extent these organisations and centres can be of help to people like us.

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