#41 [url]

Oct 23 16 11:03 AM

Monique, Scottsdale is a place where almost everybody comes from somewhere else. It’s not super wealthy but it is affluent. There are a lot of people from their late 50s to early 70s living rather comfortable but active lives that one would associate with people at least 25 years younger. The men seem to gravitate towards weightlifting and riding Harleys. I suspect a lot of them are pumped up on Viagra and testosterone. The women all just try to look good as they can. The town also has a very vibrant club / dance scene that tends to cater to those in the 20s and 30s. Between those two influences, I saw a path to constructing my own transition. Whether this is a typical boomer thing or not, I can’t say, but it is interesting to hear your perspective. Thinking about it a little bit more, I do believe that one of the pervasive characteristics of boomers over decades has been an effort to remake reality, when reality doesn’t fit our vision of what it should be. The boomers will probably be known subsequently as being a generation unwilling to easily surrender to anything without a fight, including time. I believe that attitude has always been a big part of my life, and has probably been the core element of my transition. Yet I don’t see that attitude very prevalent among most the late MtF transitioners, including boomers. They generally seem just interested in living in accordance with traditional cis expectations for their age.

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#42 [url]

Dec 30 16 2:22 PM

April wrote:
Monique, Scottsdale is a place where almost everybody comes from somewhere else. It’s not super wealthy but it is affluent. There are a lot of people from their late 50s to early 70s living rather comfortable but active lives that one would associate with people at least 25 years younger. The men seem to gravitate towards weightlifting and riding Harleys. I suspect a lot of them are pumped up on Viagra and testosterone. The women all just try to look good as they can. The town also has a very vibrant club / dance scene that tends to cater to those in the 20s and 30s. Between those two influences, I saw a path to constructing my own transition. Whether this is a typical boomer thing or not, I can’t say, but it is interesting to hear your perspective. Thinking about it a little bit more, I do believe that one of the pervasive characteristics of boomers over decades has been an effort to remake reality, when reality doesn’t fit our vision of what it should be. The boomers will probably be known subsequently as being a generation unwilling to easily surrender to anything without a fight, including time. I believe that attitude has always been a big part of my life, and has probably been the core element of my transition. Yet I don’t see that attitude very prevalent among most the late MtF transitioners, including boomers. They generally seem just interested in living in accordance with traditional cis expectations for their age.

Hello!

Oh yes, most definitely! Remaking reality "when reality doesn't fit our vision of what it should be" would be as core Boomer as it gets. For better and for worse, I might add. Though if going by the book, I think you're really supposed to be a late Boomer, meaning with a good deal of Xer in you as well. A member of the so-called cusp "Generation Jones", or maybe "Disco Boomer", as it were. smiley: smokin

So Scottsdale sounds like the place to be then. I'm happy you're living in such a nice neighbourhood. Considering how some parts of America looks these days, I get the impression you have managed to salvage the American dream.

"We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting."

- Khalil Gibran


If I cannot be a feminine traditional woman, what's the point of being a woman?

- Me

Last Edited By: Monique Dec 30 16 2:26 PM. Edited 1 time.

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#43 [url]

Jan 1 17 7:09 AM

I am quite different to most of the other members. My experience of my female side was always that of what i imagined an older and more sophisticated lady to be. Now that I am in my mid-40s I feel an affinity between my male age and my female ideal. It's a case now of blending into my female identity.

All the females I admire and who I would like to emulate are between mid-to-late 40s to late 60s.

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#44 [url]

Jan 1 17 10:16 AM

I'm not sure you're that much different than most members. In my case I've always identified with women my own age. Although I regret not being female my whole life, I have no desire to change into a younger women. I guess the important thing is that it's not a binary thing. Everyone is different to some extent.

Lindsay


"The thing is you see what you want to see and you hear what you want to hear, dig?" the Pointed Man

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#46 [url]

Mar 1 17 2:11 PM

Birth certificate wise, I'm nearly 69.

Ontologically, existentially, metaphysically . . . I'm still 17, just like I always have been, male or female.

Being pretty much officially "geriatric" -- I don't need to present "female" looking like Kiera Knightly, Sandra Bullock, or even Jane Fonda. I can easily present more like Janet Reno.

I am not schizophrenic. There is not a "he me" and a "she me" there is just me, consistently non-binary and pretty radical feminist about it.

I used to have two wardrobes. Now I have one wardrobe -- we don't much make distinctions per labels. We have figured out gender neutral clothing that works for us, labeled both "M" and "F."

There's just one me, what you see is what you get.

Allison Wunderland's Transcend Dance

http://allisontranscend.blogspot.com/

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