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Jun 18 17 1:36 AM

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The Norwegian newspaper Dagens Næringsliv recently covered the topic make-up for men in its D2 magazine.

"Beauty boys" gets their inspiration from drag queen make-up and modern fashion trends. The main difference between drag and beauty boys is that beauty boys do not present as women, and they use regular make-up, not the theatre type. You would have to ask them if they believe they fit under the broad transgender umbrella or not. I guess some of them do, others not.

In 2016 James Charles became the first male face of the cosmetic firm Covergirl. Maybelline has hired Manny Gutierrez, Rimmel has engaged Lewys Ball and L'Oréal has Gary Thompson. James Charles was probably not the best choice for Covergirl, as he was recently caught posting a nasty racist tweet on twitter, but that does not change the point of this story: That there is now a sub-culture for men who identify as men and who still want to express themselves using feminine make-up.  Others argue that this is another example of the beauty business becoming more acceptive of androgyny.

D2 presents Joachim O. Hansen, who tells the journalist that he used make-up for the first time at the age of 11, stealing maskara from his mother. He is now 13 and runs a popular Instagram-account, and is also part of the Snapchat-collective Fleeky Make-Up.

It seems to me that the Beauty Boy phenomenon has its main roots in gay culture. All the same, it might have an effect on the gender expression of male assigned persons of all sexualities and gender identities.


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#1 [url]

Jun 18 17 1:50 PM

Maybe the cosmetic industry is just trying to increase sales. But it's still a very positive move. It helps in allowing men to have a more feminine presentation.

Lindsay


"The thing is you see what you want to see and you hear what you want to hear, dig?" the Pointed Man

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#2 [url]

Jun 25 17 3:37 AM

Personally, I don't see the point of it. If you identify as a man, especially if you're hetero, I'd prefer you'd outwardly present as such. Makes everything so much simpler. Guess I have a thing for sexual dimorphism.

c836be4074b24781b41275f949f97040_r.jpg


"We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting."

- Khalil Gibran


If I cannot be a feminine traditional woman, what's the point of being a woman?

- Me

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#3 [url]

Jun 28 17 12:02 PM

I think this is a wonderful trend!

I think that anything that makes it easier for men to expand beyond the limits of masculinity is a good thing.

Western society allows women to be anything from Jessica Rabbit to an US Army Ranger.

What is the problem with a boy who wears make-up?  Let boys be feminine!  They are not hurting anyone.


Yes.  Things are easier for gay men.  Gay men idolize masculine men, but they do not enforce the same gender system that straights buy into.

Last Edited By: harry2793 Jun 28 17 12:09 PM. Edited 1 time.

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#4 [url]

Jun 28 17 12:52 PM

Monique, I will have to disagree with you on this one. Clearly, all the pictures here are males trying to emulate somebody like Boy George. But I know enough about makeup now to realize that it's possible for more conventional male presentations to be enhanced with a little bit of help from the cosmetics industry. But I don't see any reason why it has to stop there. I love gender bending that is done rather well, and see no reason why boys have to be purely boys or girls need to be purely girls. I still butch it up on occasion to pacify certain parts of my old life,. but my butch has become less and less butch with time. I'm not exactly Boy George when I am that way, but I get people guessing what I am all about, which is actually sort of fun as a short retreat from my more uber girl presentation. The gender binary is dying, thank God!

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#5 [url]

Jun 30 17 8:17 AM

I did a little experiment yesterday. I went out to a gay bar I hadn't been to before, as a rather feminine looking boy. I wasn't exactly as flamboyant as the pictures above, but I had on my full girl mode makeup with boy clothing (a plain white T-shirt, long gym type shorts, and male athletic shoes). My hair, which is shoulder length now, was flowing down underneath a baseball cap.When I am this way, I think I resemble a heavy metal guitar player from the 80s, but even with fairly loose clothing the effects of HRT are pretty evident now, from my face to my hips, and I have pretty much given up on trying to hide my boobs when I go out this way. I was curious how people would react to me. Something I have learned about gay bars is that there is always a table or two of regulars, and they always want to know who you are and who you are into. Sure enough, after sitting at the bar for about a half hour, a guy from a table of about 10 people approached me, and asked if I wanted to join them. After doing that, it didn't take 30 seconds for somebody to ask me what were the dirty details of my life. Some had thought I was actually a girl trying to look butch. That was second time that somebody had said that to me. I think it is really cool.

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#6 [url]

Jul 6 17 8:47 PM

Monique wrote:
Personally, I don't see the point of it. If you identify as a man, especially if you're hetero, I'd prefer you'd outwardly present as such. Makes everything so much simpler. Guess I have a thing for sexual dimorphism.


 

Men's skincare is make-up.  It's just invisible.  Men's fashion is their vanity.  There used to be salons for men.  Those were the days!! Sniff, sniff........

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#7 [url]

Jul 7 17 2:26 PM

Social context has a great deal to do with how all this make-up thing works. Most of the women I know who work in construction and other heavy industry (like engineers) don't wear a lot of make-up. The club scene, particularly the gay club scene has a differnt social context. Narratologically the club scene is a socially appropriate venue for make-up and gender ambiguity.

I'm not seeing a lot of this sort of make-up day to day on the street. That said, I see a great deal of gender identity balder that is entirely absurd in my view, cammo being a convenient example.

Allison Wunderland's Transcend Dance
http://allisontranscend.blogspot.com/

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#8 [url]

Jul 8 17 4:41 AM

Speaking about cammo, if there is anything I can't stand it's cammo prints, baggy clothes and hoodies. Not to mention baseball caps (yeah, repeating myself). I really, really hate all of that! My feeling is it represents a sort of wayward, claustrophobic and corrosive masculinity without a legitimate outlet that however nevertheless results in violence and misogyny. A thwarted masculinity that's unable to get expressed, but that do explode from time to time, especially among gutter level poker machine troglodytes.

I'm not sure I'm right about anything, it's just the way I feel.

Once upon a time tight leather jackets or wide cuffed shiny leather gloves on chauffeurs were considered highly masculine. Now it's "gay". If anyone had launched the hooded, tight suited superhero concept today, people would have called the inventor a faggot.

It's so deplorable men today are not allowed to look sexy. At least since I love the look/feel of big sexy men! smiley: tongue

(Okay now, I know what you are thinking, but spare me the Borat jokes, please! I'm actually way too sensitive to be taunted like that.)

There is a reason neoprene wetsuits nowadays are turned inside out to show the dull side rather than the shiny one, that's all I'm saying. Cause men are not allowed to look sexy no more!


I'm just not sure men putting on girly makeup to look exactly like physically weak women is really the answer. I mean, hell, if so, why not go all the way and become one yourself!




"We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting."

- Khalil Gibran


If I cannot be a feminine traditional woman, what's the point of being a woman?

- Me

Last Edited By: Monique Jul 8 17 7:14 AM. Edited 10 times.

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#9 [url]

Jul 8 17 5:03 AM

lal2828 wrote:
Monique wrote:
Personally, I don't see the point of it. If you identify as a man, especially if you're hetero, I'd prefer you'd outwardly present as such. Makes everything so much simpler. Guess I have a thing for sexual dimorphism.


 

Men's skincare is make-up.  It's just invisible.  Men's fashion is their vanity.  There used to be salons for men.  Those were the days!! Sniff, sniff........

I actually do agree. Especially about the salons. I really do.

"We live only to discover beauty. All else is a form of waiting."

- Khalil Gibran


If I cannot be a feminine traditional woman, what's the point of being a woman?

- Me

Last Edited By: Monique Jul 8 17 5:06 AM. Edited 1 time.

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