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Sep 14 16 10:47 PM

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Here's an interesting article on the concept of sex addicts.

I know that many crossdreamers too wonder if their obsession with crossdressing og crossdreamer erotica is a sign of an addiction.

It may certainly become an obession and get in the way of the rest of our lives, but medically speaking there is no such thing as a sex addiction. The mechanism underlying an obsession with "TG transformations" is very different from the one at the base of a --- let's say -- heroine addiction.
When addicts, including those addicted to drugs, alcohol, smoking, and gambling, are shown pictures of their drug of choice there is a clear and uniform response in their P300 brain waves, which are usually activated when we see something of particular interest or desire, as well as increased late positive potential (LPP) response, which measures the intensity of the brain’s response to a specific thing at a given moment.However, when UCLA researchers studied the response to viewing sexually explicit images in people who self-defined as being unable to regulate their porn viewing, the results showed no similar response in either brain measure (Steele, Staley, Fong, & Prause, 2013; Prause, Steele, Sabatinelli, & Hajcak, 2015). In fact, they found the only thing correlated with brain wave activity was sexual desire such that the higher their self-reported sexual desire, the more brain wave activity they showed. The authors concluded that there was no evidence to say that even problem sexual regulation fit the definition of addiction as defined by brain response and that these people simply had high sex drives.
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#1 [url]

Sep 19 16 2:04 AM

Good research work. I think, compare with drug addiction or gambling, sexual stimulus - are natural and nothing wrong with it. If some people very likes TG fiction ot porn, it is not addiction, just individual sexual preference plus high sex drive.

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#2 [url]

Sep 19 16 11:36 PM

Gambling and sexual stimulus are completely two different things and act on the brain in different ways. I remember from the ages of 16-27 where I was a slot machine addict which caused me a lot of issues from crime to living on the streets and other peoples floors, parent problems and the such. But while gambling the sensations are of cold sweets an irritability waiting for places to open so I could play them. The buzz of winning gave a great high and losing was a way of beating myself up worrying how the devil am I going to pay the rent, which again would make you feel that you have to survive, this was all a way of coping.

Now porn has non of those effects on me and is used, I find as a way of learning more about my sexuality, I can go years without watching this and have periods of constant watching ok once a day, but depending also if I want a rest from crossdreaming which does have a more simulating effect on me. Why is this so, a high sex drive, that's why I have four kids all with my wife I might add :-) I have been like this since puberty.

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#3 [url]

Sep 20 16 12:11 AM

Although there are crime committed by the porn industry (trafficking, abuse of drug addicts, violence), it seems to me that the anti-porn movement is mostly another attempt at conditioning people by controlling their sexuality. This has been one of the most effective ways of keeping rebellion at bay, both among young people, women and different shades of queer.

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#4 [url]

Sep 20 16 11:45 AM

jackmolay wrote:
Although there are crime committed by the porn industry (trafficking, abuse of drug addicts, violence), it seems to me that the anti-porn movement is mostly another attempt at conditioning people by controlling their sexuality. This has been one of the most effective ways of keeping rebellion at bay, both among young people, women and different shades of queer.

Porn is to me a doubleedged sword.

On one hand, you are right that anti-porn is used as a way to control sexuality and thus control people. I also don't like taking peoples agency from them, by claiming that everyone that participates are victims. On the other hand, I think there are some seriously bad things to be said about most of the porn industry.

I don't have a problem with porn. I have a problem with (most of) the porn industry.

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#5 [url]

Sep 22 16 11:43 PM

I don't have a problem with porn. I have a problem with (most of) the porn industry.


That makes sense to me. But how does one create a porn industry (or -- rather -- a erotica industry) that is liberating and humane?
 

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#6 [url]

Sep 26 16 1:55 AM

Before getting involved in the UK adult industry a few years back, I had a rather dim view of the industry. However after making 200 plus hard core shorts with a variety of UK models for a UK pornographer I was rather surprised at how 'nice' the industry actually is. I never met anyone who lived upto the stereotype of a porn star, everone I delt with was super pleasant and professional. Everone worked very hard for their money and everone involved wanted what ever project we worked on to be a sucess. No one was forced in anyway, models are queing up for work and love to do what they do. The whole experience changed my view on female sexuality. Everyone is paid on the day and everone goes away happy. This is more than I can say for the many 'normal' jobs I have done in the past suffering office politics, back stabbing, poor pay/late pay and the regular 9 to 5 misery.  My own experience has shown me that the media has told a lot of lies about the industry. Mind you I can only talk from a UK perpective. 

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#7 [url]

Sep 26 16 5:12 AM

I am glad to hear that, Cheryl. I guess humans are humans whereever you go -- in the sense that there will be those who are bad and those who are good.

We might have a tendency of turning all women who work in the various "adult" industries into victims only, not recognizing that many of them are independent, hard working women who does this of their own free will. That does not necessarily mean that it is a good choice (what do I know), but if we pretend that they are nothing but victims, we are actually turning them into the stereotype of the weak and helpless woman favored by those who despise women.

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#8 [url]

Sep 26 16 8:58 AM

jackmolay wrote:
I am glad to hear that, Cheryl. I guess humans are humans whereever you go -- in the sense that there will be those who are bad and those who are good.

We might have a tendency of turning all women who work in the various "adult" industries into victims only, not recognizing that many of them are independent, hard working women who does this of their own free will. 

 
We could also ask ourselves too which degree (if any) anyone of us has free will to begin with? (here I am just looking at it from a practical point of view - when we start to include the nature of consciousness in this discussion it becomes an even more difficult discussion). We are all affected by nature and nurture. At best, we operate within a "bounded free will".

In parallel, newer danish research on say sex trafficking highlights the complex nature on agency vs. victimhood. These people are born in poverty, lives in warzones, famine stricken areas etc. But they are also agentic in the sense that they work to help create a better future for them and their families. One paradox f.ex. is that street prostitution in Denmark is less dangerous than selling food from a street kitchen in Benin.

We all operate within the boundaries of "what we want" vs. "what we can". And I obviously went out on a tangent.....
 

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